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H2O-Pal Helps You Get Your Two Gallons Of Water A Day

The United States National Laboratory Of Water Drinking And Health not a real laboratory recommends that all humans drink lots of water all the time. That’s why H2O-Pal exists – it’s a water bottle that tells you how much you’ve drunk and, more important, when you’ve reached the daily goal of two to five gallons Warning: you could probably drink less needed to stay alive.The system uses a scale and accelerometer to see how much water you drink during the day. You fill the bottle, snap on the electronics, and hit the town. You can pull the puck-like device off of the bottle for washing. It then connects to your iPhone via Bluetooth to report your drinking habits.

via TechCrunch.

What’s the Problem with Plastic Bottles?

You may have read what’s bad about plastic bags and decided to reduce the amount of disposables you consume, and that’s a great direction to be heading in. But there’s another problem in the plastic-trash minefield that needs tackling — in the U.S., 1,500 plastic water bottles are consumed every second. Here’s why that’s a major problem for humans, the environment, and the animals on our planet.

The Human Impact

Plastic bottles contain Bisphenol A (BPA), the chemical used to make the plastic hard and clear. BPA is an endocrine disruptor which has been proven to be hazardous to human health. It has been strongly linked to a host of health problems including certain types of cancer, neurological difficulties, early puberty in girls, reduced fertility in women, premature labour, and defects in newborn babies – to name a few examples. BPA enters the human body through exposure to plastics such as bottled drinks and cleaning products. It has been found in significant amounts in at-risk groups such as pregnant women’s placentas and growing foetuses. A study conducted last year found that 96% of women in the U.S have BPA in their bodies.

The good news is that you can have your BPA levels measured and make lifestyle changes to lower them, as demonstrated by Jeb Berrier in his film about plastic consumer merchandise, Bag It.

via One Green Planet.